voiceofnature:

Every time people say animals don’t have feelings, I show them this.

25 Of The Best Parenting Moments In The Animal Kingdom

(via oh-evokeme)

ancientart:

"They take first a crooked piece of iron, and with it draw out the brain through the nostrils, thus getting rid of a portion, while the skull is cleared of the rest by rinsing with drugs; next they make a cut along the flank with a sharp Ethiopian stone, and take out the whole contents of the abdomen, which they then cleanse, washing it thoroughly with palm wine, and again frequently with an infusion of pounded aromatics…" -Greek historian Herodotus describes the process of mummification in Egypt (trans. Rawlinson).

Shown here is an extraordinarily well preserved Egyptian mummy at the Louvre. This man lived during the Ptolemaic Period, and his name can be read as either Nenu or Pachery. The body has been sophisticatedly wrapped in strips of linen, and the mummy is covered with a cartonnage. Included here is a mask, an apron across the legs, and a collar over the chest.

Rigault Patricia from the Louvre provides the below description. This is only a section of the full write-up, you can read the rest here if you wish.

A body preserved for eternity

Not everyone in ancient Egypt had access to the funerary practices that ensured eternal life, and many people had to settle for a simple pit in the desert and a few modest offerings. For the more fortunate, preserving body provided an additional guarantee of survival in the afterlife. It offered a new support for the various elements of the living being that were dispersed at the time of death. Although the earliest mummies were little more than bodies wrapped in linen strips dipped in resin, more sophisticated methods soon developed; mummification procedures were highly perfected by the New Kingdom.

Although the number of mummies increased from this period on, the quality of the work tended to decrease. Nevertheless, mummies from the Greco-Roman period are often remarkable for the highly subtle designs formed by the interwoven linen strips. Depending on the period, a mummy could be covered a clothing, a net of beads, a mask, or a decorated wooden plank or cartonnage. During the Ptolemaic Period, various cartonnage elements were arranged on the mummy before it was placed in the coffin. 

Courtesy of & currently at the Louvre, France, N 2627. Photos by: Massimo Palmieri (1), Yann Caradec (2 & 3, cropped), and Oleg Ы (4).

(via oh-evokeme)

thisismyplacetobe:

A ‘Ring of Fire’ solar eclipse is a rare phenomenon that occurs when the moon’s orbit is at its apogee: the part of its orbit farthest away from the Earth. Because the moon is so far away, it seems smaller than normal to the human eye. The result is that the moon doesn’t entirely block out our view of the sun, but leaves an “annulus,” or ring of sunlight glowing around it. Hence the term  “annular” eclipse rather than a “total” eclipse.

(via artflow-km)

(Source: derwiduhudar, via shatahad)

Planet Terror (2007)

(Source: britstevenson, via necroerotic)

ergo?"
"sure, i read."

(Source: bckys, via marveloki)

gabrielhardman:


Figure drawings by Gabriel Hardman. 18x24. Conté and pastel. September 6th, 2014. Los Angeles.

(via biggoonie)

thedragoninmygarage:

The Long Island Medium
Theresa Caputo, also known as the Long Island Medium, can totally talk to dead people, for reals, no joke. She claims to have started Haley Joel Osmenting when she was 4 years old and has been a practicing (and certified!) medium for over 10 years, showcasing her amazing abilities on her hit TLC reality show since 2011. She presumably keeps her hair in the shape of a microphone to help her receive transmissions from the spirit world.

The Fraud:
Watch her bomb spectacularly in front of a room full of people who stubbornly refused to have recently deceased mothers and then marvel as she blames it on fickle spirits, because clearly it’s the ghosts’ fault and not the fact that she can’t actually communicate with the dead.

Professional debunker James Randi examined Caputo’s act and, to no one’s surprise, determined that it was nothing more than a very familiar sideshow routine. Just like John Edward and countless others before her, she’s simply quite skilled at an age-old technique known as cold reading, a method in which a performer “can pick up enough information in what seems like innocent, idle conversation” to make it seem like they are reading your mind. Basically, it’s just intuitive guesswork. She’s so good at it, in fact, that along with D.J. Groethe (president of the James Randi Educational Foundation), Randi awarded her the 2012 Pigasus Award, reserved for “the most deserving charlatans, swindlers, psychics, pseudoscientists, and faith healers.” It’s the kind of award you don’t accept in person.

Meanwhile, an investigation by Inside Edition found that, while Long Island Medium is edited to make it appear as though Caputo is a font of supernatural wisdom, she strikes out again and again during live readings. She brushes off these embarrassing gaffes by insisting that the blazingly incorrect message she received must have been intended for someone else (this is known as “piggybacking”).

Private investigator Ron Tebo maintains a collection of Caputo’s failures on YouTube (he did the clip above) and spent over a year interviewing her past clients to discover that the majority of them felt ripped off (because Caputo happily demands cash payment in exchange for sharing her incredible gift). Her response to fraud allegations is the verbal equivalent of a shrug — “I respect and understand skeptics. I’m not trying to prove anything to anyone, that’s not why I do what I do. I feel, and have been told by my clients, that my gift has really helped them, and that’s all that matters to me.”

Source: Cracked.com, YouTube

failed-mad-scientist:

Poison Ivy - Cameron Stewart

failed-mad-scientist:

Poison Ivy - Cameron Stewart

(via hop-frog)

(Source: kattnoircosplay, via hop-frog)

(Source: ldarknessl, via ldarknessl)

prettybabo:

In the first episode of Science Britannica Professor Brian Cox recreates Sir Humphry Davy’s exploding iodine experiment in which he temporarily blinded himself.

Davy that is, not Prof. Brian!

(via thedragoninmygarage)

kamikame-cosplay:

Awesome Bobba Fett ball gown, Photo by New Now Next.
Who knew Boba Fett was so crafty! I love how tastefully all the aspects of his classic costume have been incorporated into her cosplay, right down to what I presume is a wookie scalp purse. I’ve been unable to discover the identity of this cosplayer, (which I suppose is oddly appropriate) so if anyone happens to know who she is, please let us know so we can credit her!
Do you know who she is?

kamikame-cosplay:

Awesome Bobba Fett ball gown, Photo by New Now Next.

Who knew Boba Fett was so crafty! I love how tastefully all the aspects of his classic costume have been incorporated into her cosplay, right down to what I presume is a wookie scalp purse. I’ve been unable to discover the identity of this cosplayer, (which I suppose is oddly appropriate) so if anyone happens to know who she is, please let us know so we can credit her!

Do you know who she is?

(via gaminginyourunderwear)